Ooltewah, Tennessee Dentistry

423.238.5744

BROOKS M. PRUEHS, D.D.S.


Dental Crowns: Uses, Types and  Procedure Information


A dental crown is a tooth-shaped "cap" that is placed over a tooth to cover the tooth to restore its shape and size, strength, and improve its appearance. The crowns, when cemented into place, fully encase the entire visible portion of a tooth that lies at and above the gum line.  Dr. Brooks takes great pride in using the best materials for crowns to not only last a long time, but also look very natural.


Why Is a Dental Crown Needed?
A dental crown may be needed in the following situations:
-To protect a weak tooth (for instance, from decay) from breaking or to hold together parts of a cracked tooth
-To restore an already broken tooth or a tooth that has been severely worn down
-To cover and support a tooth with a large filling when there isn't a lot of tooth left
-To hold a dental bridge in place
-To cover misshapened or severely discolored teeth
-To cover a dental implant
-To make a cosmetic modification


Procedure Information:

The tooth receiving the crown is filed down along the chewing surface and sides to make room for the crown. The amount removed depends on the type of crown used. If, on the other hand, a large area of the tooth is missing (due to decay or damage), your dentist will use filling material to "build up" the tooth to support the crown. 


After reshaping the tooth, your dentist will use a paste or putty to make an impression of the tooth to receive the crown. Impressions of the teeth above and below the tooth to receive the dental crown will also be made to make sure that the crown will not affect your bite. The impressions are sent to a dental lab where the crown will be manufactured. The crown is usually returned to your dentist's office in two to three weeks. If the crown is made of porcelain, your dentist will also select the shade that most closely matches the color of the neighboring teeth. During this first office visit your dentist will make a temporary crown to cover and protect the prepared tooth while the crown is being made. Temporary crowns usually are made of acrylic and are held in place using a temporary cement.


How Should I Care for My Temporary Dental Crown?

Because temporary dental crowns are just that -- a temporary fix until a permanent crown is ready -- most dentists suggest that a few precautions. These include:

-Avoid sticky, chewy foods (ie, chewing gum, caramel), which have the potential of grabbing and pulling off the crown.

-Minimize use of the side of your mouth with the temporary crown. Shift the bulk of your chewing to the other side.

-Avoid chewing hard foods (such as raw vegetables), which could dislodge or break the crown.

-Slide flossing material out-rather than lifting out-when cleaning your teeth.


How Long Do Dental Crowns Last?

On average, dental crowns last between five and 15 years. The life span of a crown depends on the amount of "wear and tear" the crown is exposed to, how well you follow good oral hygiene practices, and your personal mouth-related habits (you should avoid such habits as grinding or clenching your teeth, chewing ice, biting fingernails, and using your teeth to open packaging).